Monday, May 23, 2016

CFP for HCOMP 2016, deadline soon

The deadline for AAAI Conference on Human Computation (HCOMP) 2016 is nearly here.  It is an application domain where the depth and reasoning of theory CS folks might find unexpectedly rich outlet. You will see our folks deeply involved in organizing the conference including Arpita G, Sid S, Santosh V,  Jenn W. V, and others. 

The theme for HCOMP 2016 is Interaction:
  • between people and technology that is foundational to human computation
  • between theoretical foundations, experimental work, and engineering
  • between the computational, scientific, and social applications of crowdsourcing
  • between diverse disciplines and perspectives, within our community and beyond
HCOMP strongly believes in inviting, fostering, and promoting broad, interdisciplinary research on crowdsourcing and human computation. Submissions may present principles, studies, and/or applications of systems that rely on programmatic interaction with crowds, or where human perception, knowledge, reasoning, or physical activity and coordination contributes to the operation of computational systems, applications, or services. More generally, we invite submissions from the broad spectrum of related fields and application areas including (but not limited to):

  • human-centered crowd studies: e.g., human-computer interaction, social computing, design, cognitive and behavioral sciences (psychology and sociology), management science, economics, policy, ethics, etc.
  • applications and algorithms: e.g., computer vision, cultural heritage, databases, digital humanities, information retrieval, machine learning, natural language (and speech) processing, optimization, programming languages, systems, etc.
  • crowdsourcing areas: e.g., citizen science, collective action, collective knowledge, crowdsourcing contests, crowd creativity, crowd funding, crowd ideation, crowd sensing, distributed work, freelancer economy, open innovation, microtasks, prediction markets, wisdom of crowds, etc.
To ensure relevance, submissions are encouraged to include research questions and contributions of broad interest to crowdsourcing and human computation, as well as discuss relevant open problems and prior work in the field. When evaluation is conducted entirely within a specific domain, authors are encouraged to discuss how findings might generalize to other communities and application areas using crowdsourcing and human computation.
Full CFP is hereMay 31, 2016: Abstracts (for Full Papers) due. June 7, 2016: Full Papers due. 



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